Tag Archives: Hey Rosetta!

March 2019 Favourites

The Last Days of Disco

For the uninitiated, each month I break down a few of my favourite things from the previous month. I don’t limit it to film-related things, but this month’s list happens to be pretty heavy on that front. Here’s to a more diverse April?

At the Cinema: The Last Days of Disco with Whit Stillman
Despite being a pretty big fan of Stillman’s most recent film (2016’s Love & Friendship) and mostly liking the film he made prior to that (2012’s Damsels in Distress) I’d never delved into his pre-2000 filmography – arguably his most touted work. So when a 35mm screening of the final installment of his ‘90s loose trilogy, The Last Days of Disco, was announced (with Stillman in attendance, no less!) I knew it was a must-see. The film was as incisive and funny as I’d hoped, and the Q&A with Stillman afterwards a delight.

Depressing Viewing at the Cinema: Climax & High Life
This month, I checked out two A24 releases from French auteurs at the theatre, Gaspar Noe’s Climax and Claire Denis’ High Life (full review here). I can’t claim that either were especially fun viewing experiences, as both directors proved to be experts at ratcheting up the anxiety-inducing strangeness being depicted on screen. (The films actually had more in common than I would have predicted.) I came out of both with extremely mixed feelings, but in the days since I’ve thought about both of them a lot. Ultimately I think both are great – it just took me a bit longer to come to that conclusion.

News: High school theatre and Keanu Reeves
Good news is scarce these days but there were a pair of delightful, film-related stories that captured my – and many other people’s – imagination this past month. The first was this story about a high school in New Jersey that for their spring play chose to adapt, of all things, Ridley Scott’s 1979 classic Alien. The sheer ambition and creativity of such an endeavour is worthy of praise in itself, but this particular high school play also looks kind of amazing? And lest you roll eyes thinking about all of the money that was probably sunk into the production, fear not! Apparently it was all done extremely cheaply, with the impressive costuming made entirely out of recycled materials.

Also full of unassuming charm was this other story about Keanu Reeves. When a flight that Reeves was on had to make an emergency landing, he made the best of the situation and seemingly had a grand old time with his fellow passengers as they opted to take a bus for the last leg of their trip. Social media for once served a positive purpose, with one travelling companion sharing some delightful snippets from the journey on Instagram (video is in the article).

Song: “All Hands” by Tim Baker
For my money, Hey Rosetta! is one of the best bands to come out of Canada in the 21st century, so I was sad to hear that they’d decided to go on “indefinite hiatus” back in 2017. And while it may not be a reunion, the solo work coming out recently from Hey Rosetta! frontman Tim Baker helps somewhat fill the gap. His first full-length album comes out later in April, and the early tracks that have been released are sounding great. My favourite of the group (released in March) is “All Hands”, which has the same urgency and yearning of Hey Rosetta’s! best, but with a stamp that is unique to Baker as his own distinct artist.

Blank Check Podcast’s March Madness Bracket
For those who aren’t already familiar, Blank Check is a podcast where its hosts David Sims and Griffin Newman explore the career of filmmakers on a one-film-per-episode basis. They feature those who have earned the coveted “blank check” from Hollywood, which limits the pool slightly, and each March they turn the decision-making duties to the good people of Twitter. I followed their March Madness-style bracket all month (with one match-up per day decided via Twitter poll), which featured such inspired pairings as John Carpenter vs. Penny Marshall and Paul Thomas Anderson vs. Paul W.S. Anderson. A lot of the races were surprisingly close, and despite the fact that my picks lost almost every round, I suppose it ultimately didn’t matter, because Jonathan Demme, who ultimately emerged victorious, was my choice to win. The show’s Demme mini-series will apparently start in the fall, which means I have plenty of time to rectify the many blind spots I have in his filmography.